This color is known throughout Disney as “no-see-um green.” It’s the color that Disney paints things that they don’t want you to pay attention to (like, for example, the Club 33 door).

Disney Imagineers found it to be the area of the spectrum least likely to draw your attention.
There are subtle variations to no-see-um green. As intercot user Mufasa says:

Even for the common utility green I think you’re referring to (sometimes called go-away or no-see-um green) there is not just a single formulation that is used. Even one imagineer talking to another could get confused (which green are you referring to? Because the go-away green on Club 33’s door is a much bluer shade than say the green used on the Indiana Jones show building)Specifying paints, shades and finishes used in the parks has always been a challenge to maintain consistency and standards for attractions.Sometimes there are internally developed systems (Disney/Hench Color System named after John Hench) or a system like the Plochere Color System might be used to describe a particular color that doesn’t match any commercial off the shelf paint color but could be matched and mixed to fit.And often a shade such as the green might be specific to an attraction so for example the color board for the American Adventure might specify that the terne metal exposed elements to be painted with Disney Color #D-4115 using a low sheen polyurethane enamel (so that would mean nothing to your local home depot/lowes paint department).Even with attractions that are identical, the fact that it is in Anaheim or Florida will require that the shade be adjusted to account for atmospheric lighting conditions (blue skies in WDW are more intense than the skies in DL), the track of the sun through the sky during the day or even the quality of the light that actually gets bounced and reflected back from the ground.However a lot of times we will use and specify products directly taken from manufacturer catalogs (and they may be chosen for a specific reason because of their formulation as far as colorants and their fade resistance to the elements or wear as far as things like chalking for exterior paints) so it wouldn’t be unusual to see a grey specified to be painted using Benjamin Moore 2126-30 (anchor grey) on an attraction’s color board during mock-up.If an exact match in an existing manufacturer color system can’t be found off the shelf than something like the ICI notation is used from which a custom shade can be mixed up.The ICI system breaks up 8 color families into 99 divisions to describe hue, then there is a number to indicate light reflectance in 100 steps and the chroma/saturation in 1000 steps and would look something like:70YR 83/140 (a red-orange)

In fact, the colors of buildings backstage have a little less blue to them, so they are greener and blend in better with the berm of trees surrounding the park. You can see the difference in this shot of the Winnie the Pooh show building:

Want a little no-see-um green for a project you’re working on? The color at the top of this post has an RGB value of 139, 153, 153.

This color is known throughout Disney as “no-see-um green.” It’s the color that Disney paints things that they don’t want you to pay attention to (like, for example, the Club 33 door).

Disney Imagineers found it to be the area of the spectrum least likely to draw your attention.

There are subtle variations to no-see-um green. As intercot user Mufasa says:

Even for the common utility green I think you’re referring to (sometimes called go-away or no-see-um green) there is not just a single formulation that is used. Even one imagineer talking to another could get confused (which green are you referring to? Because the go-away green on Club 33’s door is a much bluer shade than say the green used on the Indiana Jones show building)

Specifying paints, shades and finishes used in the parks has always been a challenge to maintain consistency and standards for attractions.

Sometimes there are internally developed systems (Disney/Hench Color System named after John Hench) or a system like the Plochere Color System might be used to describe a particular color that doesn’t match any commercial off the shelf paint color but could be matched and mixed to fit.

And often a shade such as the green might be specific to an attraction so for example the color board for the American Adventure might specify that the terne metal exposed elements to be painted with Disney Color #D-4115 using a low sheen polyurethane enamel (so that would mean nothing to your local home depot/lowes paint department).

Even with attractions that are identical, the fact that it is in Anaheim or Florida will require that the shade be adjusted to account for atmospheric lighting conditions (blue skies in WDW are more intense than the skies in DL), the track of the sun through the sky during the day or even the quality of the light that actually gets bounced and reflected back from the ground.

However a lot of times we will use and specify products directly taken from manufacturer catalogs (and they may be chosen for a specific reason because of their formulation as far as colorants and their fade resistance to the elements or wear as far as things like chalking for exterior paints) so it wouldn’t be unusual to see a grey specified to be painted using Benjamin Moore 2126-30 (anchor grey) on an attraction’s color board during mock-up.

If an exact match in an existing manufacturer color system can’t be found off the shelf than something like the ICI notation is used from which a custom shade can be mixed up.

The ICI system breaks up 8 color families into 99 divisions to describe hue, then there is a number to indicate light reflectance in 100 steps and the chroma/saturation in 1000 steps and would look something like:

70YR 83/140 (a red-orange)

In fact, the colors of buildings backstage have a little less blue to them, so they are greener and blend in better with the berm of trees surrounding the park. You can see the difference in this shot of the Winnie the Pooh show building:

Want a little no-see-um green for a project you’re working on? The color at the top of this post has an RGB value of 139, 153, 153.

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    IM SCREAMING BECAUSE IT ALL LOOKS ABSOLUTELY GREY TO ME AND I HATE BEING COLORBLIND UGH HELP
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